One Year On, is No Man’s Sky Finally the Game that Players Want?

Well…it’s getting there.

No Man’s Sky recently celebrated its first birthday. And according to the game’s most recent update, there it may just be something worth celebrating. You may recall that last year at this very same time, No Man’s Sky was in the midst of nothing short of a debacle, with players decrying the game as nothing remotely like the game they were readily and repeatedly promised.  It would be months before the game’s negative buzz quietly fizzled away. But even as the fizzling was, well, fizzling, Hello Games had an ace up its sleeve – namely, updates. A quick search reveals that since August 2016, the game has received over a dozen updates, three of which (“Foundation,” “Pathfinder” and the latest “Atlas Rises”) added significantly to the game’s core experience.

While I’ve still not laid hands on the game myself, having preferred to watch other players, I’ve been interested in the game’s evolution nonetheless. Because rather than become a forgotten footnote, Hello Games has done quite a bit of work in keeping players invested. And in a rather miraculous way, No Man’s Sky has gone from being the end of a bad joke to the start of a good conversation. If we can use Steam for a moment as a litmus test, the game’s recent reviews there have been “mostly positive.” That’s quite a switch from the “mostly negative” reviews that held the capture captive for some time. Even just looking online generally, not only are people playing No Man’s Sky again, but they’re saying generally good things about it.

And I had to admit that after seeing this latest update, “Atlas Rises,” the game hardly looks like the things that we loaded onto our PS4 a year ago.

It’s hard for me to quantify the changes, but, the fact is that now, the game looks good. Not that it necessarily looked “bad” before, but the planets look much more lush and inviting. Character interactions seem much more fulfilling, and there seem to be better paths to uncovering the game’s lore. And the new updates, “Atlas Rises” included, appear to build greatly upon the simple notion of giving players things to do, from crafting homes to completing actual missions. Certainly, the game isn’t perfect – slow progression is still a problem, dreadful inventory management remains, and promised in-game multiplayer has yet to be realized – but the fact remains that No Man’s Sky on August 2017 is a far cry from No Man’s Sky of August 2016. And it’s likely that Hello Games isn’t done yet, so who knows that No Man’s Sky of August 2018 will look like!


It’s clear now that Hello Games had a perfect vision of No Man’s Sky a year ago but wasn’t able to truly deliver on it then. With time and effort, the game has evolved into something closer to what everyone was promised, but it still has plenty of road to travel. If you’ve been playing it since day one, what do you think of the game now? If you avoided the game like the plague last year, might it be looking more enticing this year? Let us know in the comments!

(Article source: The Guardian)

Lede image by Flickr user Eric Schweichler (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

7 Comments Add yours

  1. It does look good! I’m glad they didn’t give up on it, because it had a lot of potential and I really did enjoy exploring the first planet. And I’d be on board again if it hadn’t taken me two real hours to get from the first planet to the second… they promise faster travel, but is it later in the game? I’d be willing to try again, but I don’t have two hours to spend babysitting my television….

    Liked by 1 person

    1. cary says:

      Wow, 2 hours! I don’t think I’ve watched any footage where it’s taken that long to get from one planet to another…though there could be video editing at play with some folks. I haven’t seen anything that’s said the planetary travel has been improved, but maybe they have, especially with all the nice things people are saying about the game now? With all the improvements, and even if the game looks and plays better, if not fixed, that would seem like big drawback.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I sure hope so! I mean, I wish I could say it was “user error” but I can’t think of anything I might have messed up! I’ll have to tentatively try again….

        Like

  2. Kariyanine says:

    I’m one of those that got it when it released but was disappointed in what was delivered and fell off. To note: I didn’t hate it, it was just less than impressive for me. I keep hearing about the improvements that they have made and they sound great but I think maybe my time with it is passed. If they had released this last year it would maybe have sung a different tune but I’m not sure I want to go back.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. cary says:

      That’s understandable. I can see that it might not be the most desirable game to revisit, despite the updates. Guess it’s nice to know that if ever the feeling does return, that maybe the experience may be more likely to be a worthwhile one.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. Imtiaz Ahmed says:

    I’m very happy Hello Games stuck to NMS. When it launched, I didn’t hate the game, it just felt a bit pointless at times. I’m still going to wait a bit before jumping back in though. I want to see what else will be added later down the road before I get back k into it.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. cary says:

      That’s a good idea, especially since it seems that there’s likely more to come. In a day and age when it’s all too easy for a studio to give up on one thing and move onto another, it’s good to see one sticking to its guns. It’d be nice to see NMS only get better and better.

      Liked by 1 person

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