What is Your Gaming Pet Peeve?

Pet peeves.  We all have them, and they come in all shapes and sizes.  Many involve ordinary, everyday life.  Maybe you don’t like when people walk on your carpet without taking their shoes off.  Maybe you get really irritated when people leave their shopping carts in the middle of the aisle at the grocery store.  You know, instead of off to the side.  And you either have to squeeze your way past or give up and decide that you didn’t really need a jar of mayo that badly, after all.  Yeah, that kind of stuff.  On a similar note, probably all gamers have pet peeves that are only found within the realm of video games.  Bosses that completely heal right before their health runs out.  Really dumb characters you’re supposed to protect who seem bent on getting themselves killed.  The list goes on and on.

Before I tell you my gaming pet peeve, let me begin by telling you a brief story.  The idea for this post came about when I was playing Final Fantasy V.  I have since completed the game, but I guess I just forget to publish this post before then.  Well, as much as I enjoyed this game, there were multiple occasions where I became quite upset while playing it.  No, sometimes I became downright angry for several specific reasons.  This game, as you all probably could guess, is an RPG.  And RPGs, well, they involve turn-based battles, more often than not.  And many times, those battles are completely random, and you can’t see the enemies until you’ve triggered a totally random fight with them.  This is something RPGs have done for decades.  Yes.  Decades!  And on the most part, I’ve accepted it, just like I’ve accepted the fact that I’ll lose all of my progress if I run out of lives in a platformer.  It comes with the territory.  But, just because I have grown to accept it, that doesn’t mean I like it.

Before I elaborate further, one more thing that bothered me was the game’s infrequency of save points.  While wandering about the world map, you can save whenever you feel like it.  When exploring deep caves and massive, confusing temples, you can only save at specific save points spread throughout the location’s many rooms.  Again, many video games force you to make some manner of progress before you can save, whether it be in the manner I just described or simply by completing the current stage you’re in.  This is understandable, and very rarely is it an issue for me.  It is only when save points are scattered very sparingly across a location that I get bothered.  Combine that with many, many random battles, and you have a recipe for what might possibly be the Duck’s biggest gaming pet peeve, a category of events I like to call…

Time wasters.

Yes, time wasters.  I hate things in video games…that waste my time.  You see, there have been many instances during my time with FFV where I have been very aggravated because of this.  This game is absolutely filled with dungeon-like locations, and sometimes you have to wander for a good 30-40 minutes searching for a save point before you find one.  And the whole way, my progress is repeatedly interrupted, usually as often as once every three seconds, by yet another group of enemies I had no chance of avoiding.  While I understand that battling enemies in RPGs is vital if you want to get stronger, sometimes I just wish the fighting could be on my terms.  Like everyone else reading this post today, I am a busy Duck.  I have things that I need to get done, and when I have chores or what have you looming over me, it can become very frustrating indeed when you want to wrap your game up within the next ten minutes, and that ten minutes stretches into 30 thanks to your 20th completely unwanted battle.

I mean, these locations must be absolutely packed full of monsters if you can’t go five seconds without bumping into another group.  It’s absurd!  Absurd, I tell you!

Seriously, I can never understand what game developers are thinking when they make their games this way.  Do they really believe that our schedules are so empty that we can make a grand quest out of simply finding a save point?  Why are we not given the flexibility to start and stop our games when we see fit?  If I really don’t feel like fighting enemies right now, why do I have to?  Few things bother me quite as much as a video game I want to stop playing for the day that won’t let me.

What is your gaming pet peeve?  What aspect of video games just really gets your blood boiling more than anything else?  Please let me know in the comments!

A Peeved Duck

22 Comments Add yours

  1. renxkyoko says:

    I hate it when there are just too many enemies in one battle scene, and my character is alone. I just played Tomb Raider, Definitive Edition, and believe it or not, there ‘s one battle scene where the player has to fight an army of samurais. …… literally an army. It’s ridiculous.

    Like

    1. duckofindeed says:

      That sounds crazy indeed. That kind of stuff bugs me, too. I remember playing The Legend of Spyro series, and while the games had their fair share of issues, my biggest problem was the quantity of enemies. There were so many moments where you’d have to fight wave after wave of enemies, each of which usually took a long time to kill. It got so tedious after a while and was probably the biggest reason I’ll never play those games again.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. renxkyoko says:

        Surviving a battle goes down to pure luck, not skill.

        Like

      2. duckofindeed says:

        I do dislike when battles are all about luck. Like when some bosses use attacks that are nearly impossible to survive, and sometimes they use it all the time, and other times they don’t. Or battles that require perfect timing or quick time events. The end of Uncharted 4 drove me crazy for this reason. I was just not fast enough to press the correct buttons at the correct time. How I still managed to beat the game, I have no idea.

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  2. Hatm0nster says:

    I hate having tons of sidequests dropped on me all at once. They distract from the main story, and often most of them aren’t even worth doing. So once they’re dumped on me, I have to spend time figuring out which ones are worth doing and then keep a list so that I don’t forget and wind up doing one of the pointless busy work ones.

    It would be nice if games like Dragon Age: Inquisition and Mass Effect: Andromeda had a feature that let me dump the garbage quests into a “low priority” folder or something. That way I could just stick ’em in there and get on with my game.

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    1. duckofindeed says:

      I definitely get overwhelmed by too many side quests, especially when the reward isn’t worth it in the end. For a while, I tried to keep up with all the side quests in Breath of the Wild, but when I kept accumulating more and more with little payoff (hunting down a bunch of lizards just for an elixir I don’t need feels a little pointless), I kind of just stopped bothering with the side quests on the most part.

      It’s not that extra objectives are bad, I just don’t feel like it when a game already has so many more exciting things to do. At that point, I just wanted to focus on finding shrines.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. fminuzzi says:

    Not being able to save is pretty frustrating! I think more recent games have not been so bad, but one of the reasons I sometimes find it hard to play older games is that ‘time wasting’ you mention.

    I think one of mine is mini-games that don’t tie into the rest of the game at all – they seem random (timed racing game in the middle of an RPG?) and have completely different mechanics to the rest of the game. There’s something extra bothersome about not being able to continue a game until you’ve done something that’s completely unrelated to anything you signed up for. Usually if they’re optional I skip them (cue every card game-in-a-game) and don’t feel even remotely bad.

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    1. duckofindeed says:

      I’m the same way when it comes to mini-games. I’m fine with mini-games in platformers, but in anything else, I typically avoid them. Blitz Ball in FF10. That weird card game in FF8. But when those things are required in order to proceed, that’s definitely annoying. (At least, if I recall correctly, it was totally okay if you lose in the Blitz Ball game in FF10. And lose I did.) Wasn’t there a required Chocobo race in FF7? I don’t remember if it was difficult or not, but I certainly know I was unhappy being forced to do that.

      On a similar note, I hated making the cake in Paper Mario. Suddenly, I find I can’t finish the game unless I bake a cake the exact amount of time. If I didn’t manage to hunt down a working watch, I’d never be able to do it.

      Like

  4. Imtiaz Ahmed says:

    I’d agree time wasting is a big peeve of mine. Like you I only have so much time to game, so if the game wastes my time I don’t look favourably on it.

    Time wasting can branch into several categories. Losing progress from dying due to lack of save points I’ve never encountered too much, but another thing I encountered in a recent JRPG is a need to grind to meet requirements to progress through the story. It’s needless, boring and a big waste of time. Back in the day I can see that RPG’s were newer to the scene and things like this were not accounted for, but in modern gaming I think it’s inexcusable.

    In FF5, I’ve never played, but I think back then they didn’t consider these things to be a problem then I’m assuming just because this was all so new, so I could see why FF5 missed this back then. I can’t think of any RPG back then that allowed saving anywhere to be honest.

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    1. duckofindeed says:

      Ah, yes, it’s never fun when one loses progress due to dying and a lack of save points. That used to happen to me a lot more than it does now, but it was always very frustrating. I also dislike when games have long cut scenes you can’t skip or long animations for attacks. Sephiroth’s Supernova attack at the end of FF7 was one of the most infuriating things I’ve ever witnessed in a video game. I believe it’s two full minutes, and it happens multiple times over the course of the fight. How no one at Square thought this might get boring after a while is truly baffling.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Imtiaz Ahmed says:

        Oh yea good point. I played FF8 more and the summons were cool but no way to skip them.

        Like

      2. duckofindeed says:

        Sometimes in these kinds of games, I avoid using summons entirely just so I don’t have to watch the animations for it. Some of them take so long!

        Liked by 1 person

  5. Fetch quests!!! I can’t ever understand them. I know it’s something to fill the time but it just feels like such a waste of time! Why? I almost always skip them!

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    1. duckofindeed says:

      Fetch quests are definitely pretty boring. I’d rather a game leave them out entirely than include them just to pad the game. I also don’t like side quests where I have to collect a bunch of some random item. I had to do that a lot in Breath of the Wild. Ten crickets, or ten lizards. It got rather tedious after a while.

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  6. Would you like me to repeat what I just said?
    > Yes
    No

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    1. duckofindeed says:

      Ha ha, so true! I don’t know why games assume we didn’t listen the first time.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Probably because if we were realllly listening we’d see that they tried to troll us with the repeat option 😛

        That said, would you like to join and share your articles in our FB group? We’re a growing community of gaming bloggers and we’re always looking for more great writers to share and discuss their work Just search for “Game Bloggers United” on Facebook.I think this topic would be a hoot for our members to engage with.

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      2. duckofindeed says:

        Sure, I’ll certainly check out your Facebook group. Thanks!

        Liked by 1 person

  7. Gamegato says:

    My gaming pet peeves are this: Wait times and exp grinding. By wait times I don’t mean loading times, I mean stuff inside the game that forces you to wait. A lot of great games are ruined because you have to wait if you want to use something! It sucks when you are on a really interesting quest line, and then the quest just tells you to wait. My other pet peeve, exp grinding, is another thing that just annoys me. I don’t mind time consuming quests that give you a ton of exp at the end, but I hate it when the only way to actually level up in a game is to endlessly kill monsters for hours. Take Xenoblade Chronicles X for an example. It has a semi-interesting story, and infinite side quests, but none of the sidequests are worthwhile, only giving you a few coins and the smallest amount of exp, forcing players to waste away hours endlessly killing monsters!

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    1. duckofindeed says:

      Those things bother me quite a bit, too. One of the most frustrating things about Breath of the Wild were the many times I was in the middle of exploring some mountains, only for it to rain and become too slick to climb, and I’d have to just sit there until the rain stopped so I could continue what I was doing. There were times I had worked so hard to reach a certain spot that returning at a later time was just not a good option. So wait I did. It’s a great game, but that was one thing that really bugged me.

      Grinding for exp is a terribly boring affair, as well. I had to do it all the time in FFXIII, sometimes for a full week, just to beat a boss. I’m currently playing FFXII, and I don’t understand why the tougher, optional enemies you are asked to hunt give you no experience whatsoever. I don’t see the point of not rewarding the player just a bit more.

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  8. JMS says:

    I hate games that have very obvious playtime bloat. Assassin’s Creed is a great example. Devs want to be able to say there are x number of hours of playtime, isn’t that wonderful, isn’t that value. But then half of it is chasing collectibles! Boring.

    Like

    1. duckofindeed says:

      That kind of pointless padding in games is boring indeed. Skyward Sword did a lot of that. Instead of giving us more locations to explore with unique objectives, they’d simply re-use the same locations and add some extra tasks that weren’t very fun. Let’s return to the volcano, but this time, you have to get all your items back, for some reason. Now the forest is flooded, so why not go collect some musical notes, for some reason. It wasn’t the obvious filler like some games have, but it felt like filler, nonetheless. The game would have benefited from having all those extra tasks cut entirely.

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