Today in Gaming History: 10/29/2013

Today_in_Gaming_History

October 29, 2003: Call of Duty released
Care to wish Call of Duty a happy 10th birthday? Or maybe you think it’s 9 years too old? Either way, as the world gets ready to say hello to the series 10th entry, Call of Duty: Ghosts, we’re here to mark the release of the very first Call of Duty game. First developed by Infinity Ward and published by Activision, this first person shooter was set during World War II; and the idea behind it was to immerse players in true-to-life combat situations during that war. CoD offered three campaigns (American, British, and Soviet), and each campaign held a series of objectives that the player had to meet to advance. The battlefield simulations offered in the game helped set it about from other FPSs of the time. CoD’s rise to fame is well documented since the release of this first game, which was very well received. It was given a number of Game of the Year nods and launched the franchise into stardom (or infamy, depending on your point of view).

CoD players have their favorite games in the series, but if you got a chance to play the original, how do you think it stands against its many sequels? Let’s sort through CoD’s history in the comments!

2 Comments Add yours

  1. C. T. Murphy says:

    I miss the historical age of military shooters. Medal of Honor was so good back then and Call of Duty managed to be even better.

    The major difference between then and now is that I never play Call of Duty single-player campaigns anymore. It’s all about the multiplayer, when, back with the original game came out, I would only play the singleplayer! Instead, I had things like Unreal Tournament to tide me over, multiplayer-wise.

    Like

    1. cary says:

      Yeah, these games have definitely swung wide into the realm of multiplayer with the past few titles; and I can’t think of a single one that’s been heralded for its single-player campaigns. But as I’m not into military shooters, I could be talking out my ear on that one.

      Like

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